Wounded Soldiers

……”for I know that through your prayers and God’s provision of the Spirit of Jesus Christ what has happened to me will turn out for my deliverance.”   Philippians 1:19

Intercession. What does that really mean to us as Christians? First, let’s look at the definition:

in·ter·cede– /ˌin(t)ərˈsēd/ verb         intervene on behalf of another  

That definition brings the thought of standing in the gap for another person. Taking action on their behalf when perhaps they are too weak to fight it alone. Intercession is coupled with prayer as we do battle on a spiritual level. Yet too often we forget that just as much as our enemy is spiritual, our own actions can wound those that need our intervention.

Our military has a motto to leave no one behind.  But what about the body of Christ?  Do we fight just for ourselves or for each other?  And when we see others wounded, do we run to their assistance or sit back to analyze why and how they ended up on the ground bleeding?  I recall a time early in marriage when we were praying for my husband’s healing.  As we continued to stand in prayer and not yet seeing healing, the more advice we received from others  Advice such as, “Just claim it!”  “Rebuke the enemy.”  “Maybe you don’t have enough faith.”  “Maybe there is sin in your life.”  And the list goes on.  So does the dying process of the wounded.

Having walked through this several times during tough seasons in our lives, I’ve learned the power of having someone to walk beside me……..and to just be there!  Often I have cried out, “God, please stir someone to pray for me as I have nothing left to give.”

There’s an old Steve Green song that puts it so well —

See all the wounded
Hear all their desperate cries for help
Pleading for shelter and for peace
Our comrades are suffering
Come let us meet them at their need
Don’t let a wounded soldier die

Chorus:
Come let us pour the oil
Come let us bind their hurt
Let’s cover them with a blanket of His love
Come let us break the bread
Come let us give them rest
Let’s minister healing to them
Don’t let another wounded soldier die

Obeying their orders
They fought on the front lines for our King
Capturing the enemy’s stronghold
Weakened from battle
Satan crept in to steal their lives
Don’t let a wounded soldier die

Did you catch that? Obeying orders……for our King.  In real life we recognize that if a soldier in battle is on the front lines, he might be paying the price with his life.  But we fail to see this in the spiritual war.  Instead we judge and analyze the ‘why’ of someone’s situation. We pick apart every move the person makes trying to determine where they are doing something wrong, as if they are choosing to live under constant attack.

Let’s not let others die on our watch. Declare today, “Not on my watch!” Too often ministers, leaders, and  fellow Christians are wearied from the fight due to the battle. They need someone to walk WITH them, and sometimes FOR them. Do you know a single mom fighting to keep food on the table for her kids? Intervene. Pray for help and round up others to stock her pantry. Know a teenager who is being bullied? Pray with them for strength and speak affirmations to them. Know of a minister who is bearing bruises of battle scars? Pick up the phone. Call them and let them know that their ministry matters to you and to God.

Intervene on someone’s behalf. Stand in the gap. Pray. Intercede. Leave no one behind on the battle field bleeding. Fight in the spirit while the warrior is being mended and made whole. Be a battle buddy. After all, we fight better together.

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